Name Product: Peter D. Marshall  – Script Breakdown and Film Scheduling Online Course
Market price: $67
Author: Peter D. Marshall
Home sale:

“Script Breakdown and Film Scheduling
Online Course for Indie Filmmakers”
Part One: How to Design a (Reliable) Shooting Schedule
for Feature Films and Television Productions
Script Breakdown and Film Scheduling Course

This information is invaluable!
“Based on your outline, I believe you’ve covered all those ‘I wish I knew then what I know now’ sort of questions. And man, I wish you were around when I was starting out 10 years ago! Back then, I had no idea what I was doing. And I could have really used this advice!!!” Jason Brubaker, Producer
Hello, I’m Peter D. Marshall.

I have an important question to ask you. As an Independent filmmaker (Director, Producer, Production Manager, Assistant Director etc.) what is your Number One concern when it comes to making a shooting schedule for your films?
I bet your answer is,”How do I know if this shooting schedule is realistic?”
How many times have you gone into production on a film only to realize a few days later that the shooting schedule was unmakeable – too much work was scheduled at one location; the crew’s weekend turnaround wasn’t accounted for; the curfew extension for your main location was forgotten; the company ran out of daylight and couldn’t finish an important scene!
If these situations sound familiar to you, you are not alone!
As a First Assistant Director with over 25 years in the industry, I know that a properly designed shooting schedule is crucial for your budgeting process. Without an experienced Assistant Director or Production Manager to prepare this schedule, you could end up with an unrealistic budget that will seriously impact your entire production.

Happy Gilmore
“As an indie filmmaker, this course has given me the knowledge, and the confidence, to prepare a shooting schedule that will optimize the efforts of the entire cast and crew.” Larry D. Barr, Stephenville, Texas, USA
I have worked (and survived) in the
“trenches” of the Film and Television industry.
During my 40 years in the film and television business, I have worked as a production assistant, dolly grip, electrician, assistant cameraman, commercial production manager, first assistant director, TV series creative consultant, television producer and director.
I have had the opportunity to work on all kinds of productions, from industrial films to documentaries; TV commercials to music videos; Television series to Hollywood feature films. I’ve had the chance to co-ordinate huge World War One battle scenes, to help plan complicated Visual FX shots, manage large groups of extras and direct intimate emotional scenes between actors.
By having the unique opportunity to work as both a Feature First Assistant Director AND a Television director, I’ve been able to get “up close and personal” with major Hollywood producers, exciting and imaginative directors and Academy Award winning actors.
As a First Assistant Director, I’ve worked on 13 Hollywood Feature Films,
15 Television Movies, 6 Television Series, 4 TV Pilots and over 20 Commercials.
I have worked for directors such as Zack Snyder, John Woo, Ed Zwick, Phillip Noyce, John Badham, Dennis Dugan, Anne Wheeler, Bobby Roth and Kim Manners.
I’ve also had the good fortune to work with such amazing and talented actors as Michelle Pfiefer, Kevin Spacey, Morgan Freeman, John Travolta, Goldie Hawn, Madeleine Stowe, Mel Gibson, Jerry Lewis, Jack Palance, Ashton Kutcher, Kathy Bates, Adam Sandler and Peter O’Toole (yes…I even worked with “Lawrence of Arabia!”)
“I just finished reading your book Script Breakdown & Film Scheduling. It’s an amazing and meticulous resource. Worth every cent. The blocking section was one of the most resourceful chapters for me. I have always been reluctant to take the initiative when it comes to blocking. It’s imperative when working with first time directors. Getting more information on production boards was invaluable.” Jesus Sifuentes, San Antonio, Texas USA
So how can I help you now?
I’ve been asked many times over the last few years when was I going to write a book or give a course on how to properly break down a script and make an accurate shooting schedule. Well, since I also have a passion for teaching, about 19 years ago I decided to create my first filmmaking workshop called “How to Design an Accurate Film Shooting Schedule.”
As the film and television industry changed and grew over the years, I modified and added to the content of that workshop to keep up to date with all the new filmmaking techniques and digital technologies I had learned on the sets.
That two-day Film Scheduling workshop has now become the model for my intensive 165-page course called the “Script Breakdown and Film Scheduling Online Course For Independent Filmmakers.”
Now even though the title says “Script Breakdown and Film Scheduling,”
this course is not just for Assistant Directors or Production Managers.
It was also written for Directors, Producers, Location Managers and other filmmakers who want to discover the proper steps involved in breaking down a script and creating a realistic film shooting schedule.
But it is also much more than that.
I guarantee that when you finish this in-depth Online course, you will have gained years of insider knowledge of the entire pre-production stage of making any type of Feature Film or Television series!
“You go to Film School and expect to learn everything there is about filmmaking. The reality is that you can’t learn everything about the job of being a filmmaker. One of the biggest holes in my film school education was the fact that I had absolutely no understanding of how to do a complete script breakdown and how to schedule a film. I cannot say how glad I am that Peter created this book because there is no way, other than working 20 years in the industry, that I could have learned all this. It’s a must read.” Max Marois, Vancouver, Canada
Here are the chapter headings you will find
inside this 165 page Online Course

1. Foreword by Producer David Roessell
2. My 38 Years in “The Business”
3. The 10 Commandments of Filmmaking
4. Personal Observations
5. The Differences Between Feature Films and TV
6. The Duties & Responsibilities of the First AD
7. The Duties and Responsibilities of the Director
8. The Director as Storyteller
9. The 3 Types of Director
10. The Role of the Director During Pre-Production
11. The Assistant Director / Director Relationship
12. The Director and Assistant Director Meetings
13. The Assistant Director’s Duties in Pre-Production
14. Film and Television Pre-Production Activities
15. What Happens When the Cast Arrives
16. Shooting on Film or Digital?
17. The Classic Three Act Script Structure
18. The Physical Breakdown of Scripts, Scenes & Shots
19. The Shooting Script
20. The Breakdown of Scenes in a Shooting Script
21. The Reductionism Breakdown Theory
22. Pre-Production – A Process of Discovery
23. The 3 Stages of Designing the Film Schedule
24. The 8 Step Process of Script Breakdown
25. Designing the Shooting Schedule
26. Preparing the Production Board One Liner
27. Production Board #1 – Scene Order
28. Production Board #2 – Specific Groups
29. Production Board #3 – First One Liner
30. Film and Television Scheduling Tips
31. Film and Television Scheduling Factors
32. The Day-out-of-Days
33. The Daily Call Sheet
34. The 5 Groups of On-Camera Performers
35. The 4 Types of Actors
36. The Film and Television Shooting Crew
37. Understanding Traditional Camera Techniques
38. The Director’s Shot List
39. Concepts of Blocking and Staging a Scene
40. The 5 Stages of Shooting a Scene
41. 6 Blocking Tips for Assistant Directors
42. The 180 Degree Rule
43. Understanding the Film Editing Process
44. The “50-Step Film Set Check List” for AD’s
45. How to Figure Out Scene and Shot Timings
46. Four-Step Formula for Averaging Scene Shooting Times
47. 25 Assistant Director Tips From the Trenches
48. First Assistant Director Pre-Production Cheat Sheet
49. How to Manage Conflicts on an Indie Film Production
50. General Conflict Resolution Skills
51. BONUS – Daily Prep Schedule Template
52. Film Scheduling Software
53. Acknowledgments